Stable and functional dyes for near-infrared fluorescence imaging of living subjects

Phys Org

Scientists can monitor biomolecular processes in live tissue by noninvasive optical methods, such as fluorescence imaging. However, the fluorescent dyes used for that purpose are often rather unstable, and photobleaching, lack of specificity, and poor pharmacokinetics are recurrent issues. US scientists have developed a molecular shield that stabilizes near-infrared fluorescent dyes and enhances their functionality. Their synthesis and characterization are reported in the journal Angewandte Che

New Zealanders' attitudes changed after pandemic lockdown

Science Daily

In the first few weeks of the lockdown of New Zealand in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, residents reported a slight increase in mental distress but higher levels of confidence in the government, science and the police, as well as greater patriotism, according to new research.

Scientists aim gene-targeting breakthrough against COVID-19

Science Daily

Scientists at Berkeley Lab's Molecular Foundry have joined forces with a research team at Stanford to aim a gene-targeting, antiviral agent called PAC-MAN against COVID-19.

New studies show how DNA crossovers can drive healthy, abnormal sperm, egg cell division

Phys Org

In the famous words of movie character Forrest Gump, "Life is like a box of chocolates; you never know what you're gonna get."

Egg-based coating preserves fresh produce

Science Daily

Eggs that would otherwise be wasted can be used as the base of an inexpensive coating to protect fruits and vegetables.

New learning spaces: Interaction between stakeholders and development of a school's operational culture

Phys Org

New modern physical school spaces require open communication between stakeholders in order to be transformed into meaningful learning environments, a new study from the University of Eastern Finland shows. Pre-existing pedagogies or good practices as such cannot be transferred from one space to another.

Australia's ancient geology controls the pathways of modern earthquakes

Science Daily

New research near Uluru in Australia's arid center shows that rock structures formed deep within the ancient Gondwana supercontinent controlled the rupture pathways of one of Australia's largest modern earthquakes.

NASA finds Nisarga's remnants over Central India

Phys Org

Tropical Cyclone Nisarga made landfall in west central India on June 4, and the next day NASA's Terra satellite provided a look at the remnants of the storm.

Mangrove trees won't survive sea-level rise by 2050 if emissions aren't cut

Phys Org

Mangrove trees—valuable coastal ecosystems found in Florida and other warm climates—won't survive sea-level rise by 2050 if greenhouse gas emissions aren't reduced, according to a Rutgers co-authored study in the journal Science.

Image: OSIRIS-REx swoops over sample site Osprey

Phys Org

This view of sample site Osprey on asteroid Bennu is a mosaic of images collected by NASA's OSIRIS-REx spacecraft on May 26. A total of 347 PolyCam images were stitched together and corrected to produce the mosaic, which shows the site at 0.2 inches (5 mm) per pixel at full size. The spacecraft took these images during an 820-foot (250-meter) reconnaissance pass over the site, which is the closest Osprey has been imaged. The pass was designed to provide high-resolution imagery to identify the b

Human activity threatens vertebrate evolutionary history

Science Daily

A new study maps for the first time the evolutionary history of the world's terrestrial vertebrates: amphibians, birds, mammals and reptiles. It explores how areas with large concentrations of evolutionarily distinct species are being impacted by our ever-increasing 'human footprint.'

Large-scale preparation of polymer-based room-temperature phosphorescence via click chemistry

Phys Org

Polymer-based room-temperature phosphorescence (RTP) materials can be efficiently developed by covalently embedding phosphors into the polymer matrix. The process is still, however, highly challenging on a large-scale due to inefficient binding engineering and time-consuming covalent reactions. In a new report on Science Advances, Rui Tian, and a team of research scientists at the State Key Laboratory of Chemical Resource Engineering in China, proposed a scalable preparation approach for RTP ma

Don’t Thank the Virus for Saving the Climate Yet

NY Times | Tatiana Schlossberg

There are lessons to be learned — and some benefits already — but it’s complicated. (Of course!)

Tillage and cover cropping effects on grain production

Phys Org

Incorporating cover crops with tillage reportedly results in increased cover crop decomposition rates and increased mineralization of nutrients from cover crop biomass. Multiple studies have reported mixed results for corn-soybean grain yields when planted after cover crops.

A nature-inspired coating to keep drugs from breaking down too early

Phys Org

Chemists have developed a coating that could make certain medications and other materials more stable by covering them with an outer layer much thinner than the width of a human hair.

New map of SARS-CoV-2 infection in nasal cavity provides more support for wearing masks, researchers say

Fox News | Christopher Carbone

Scientists have characterized the specific way SARS-CoV-2, which is the coronavirus that causes COVID-19, infects the nasal cavity to a great degree.

PTF1J2224+17 is a polar, new study confirms

Phys Org

German astronomers have conducted photometric observations of a cataclysmic variable (CV) star known as PTF1J2224+17. Results of the observational campaign confirm that this object is a polar, as suggested by previous studies. The new findings are presented in a paper published May 27 on arXiv.org.

Records reveal new trends in Australian temperature extremes

Phys Org

Researchers have developed Australia's longest daily temperature record, identifying a decrease in cold extremes and an increase in heatwaves since 1838.

Showtime for photosynthesis

Science Daily

Using a unique combination of nanoscale imaging and chemical analysis, researchers have revealed a key step in the molecular mechanism behind the water splitting reaction of photosynthesis, a finding that could help inform the design of renewable energy technology.

Nothing changes: Lockdown gender gap remains firm

Phys Org

While the world has been thrown into chaos by COVID-19, gender inequality has survived the pandemic intact, according to a report from Oxford's Department of Sociology, with women still carrying out most housework and childcare, although they are disproportionately exposed to the virus—as the majority of front-line health workers.

Metasurface opens world of polarization

Science Daily

Researchers have designed a metasurface that can be continuously tuned from linear to elliptical birefringence, opening up the entire space of polarization control with just one device. This single metasurface can operate as many birefringent materials in parallel, enabling more compact polarization manipulation, which could have far-reaching applications in polarization imaging, quantum optics, and other areas.

Sustainable plastics vital for greener world

Phys Org

Creating sustainable plastics is vital for the future of our environment, a new report says.

JCESR lays foundation for safer, longer-lasting batteries

Phys Org

Electricity storage in batteries is in ever increasing demand for smartphones, laptops, cars and the power grid. Solid-state batteries are among the most promising next-generation technologies because they offer a higher level of safety and potentially longer life.